Resources

It’s always nice to have a list of places to go when you want to know more.

Animated Transitions in Statistical Data Graphics, by Jeffrey Heer & George Robertson

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to d3.js, by Ian Johnson

Data Sketch|es, by Nadieh Bremer & Shirley Wu

Designing Charts — Principles Every Designer Should Know, by Ryan Bales

Design Better Data Tables, by Andrew Coyle

Distill

Polygraph, and its visual journal The Pudding

Visual Cinnamon, Nadieh Bremer’s site on all things data viz

Interactive Data Visualization for the Web, by Scott Murray

A gallery of interesting Jupyter notebooks

Analyze survey data for free, by Anthony Damico

Introduction to Statistical Learning, by Gareth James, Daniela Witten, Trevor Hastie, and Robert Tibshirani (I LOVE THIS BOOK)

The Odin Project, a web dev tutorial that focuses on Ruby and Ruby on Rails

The Mozilla Developer Network, Mozilla’s center for web dev knowledge

Learn Python the Hard Way (for Python 3), the code & lessons very easy to read

10 Minutes to pandas, part of the pandas documentation from Pydata

Beginner Python Projects, most of these are puzzles to solve (not DS related)

Intermediate Python Tips, very helpful to bridge the gap between beginner and intermediate skill levels

Python.org, home of all things python (including the documentation!)

Reddit: r/python, r/learnpython, r/datascience, r/pystats, and my eternal fave r/dataisbeautiful

FreeCodeCamp, and this list of free online CS and programming classes (starting now!)

Exploratory Data Analysis (EDA) tutorial, from KDnuggets

An example workflow for Kaggle competitions: until reading this I hadn’t considered documenting and streamlining my own workflow for projects and competitions. I’m not sure I would do all of the things the OP listed now as a beginner, but its a good idea to have a plan that you adhere to 100% of the time so nothing gets forgotten.

Resources for a new (Kaggle) data project, from Megan Risdal at Kaggle

An article about learning development skills & teaching them to others, by Michael Mangialardi